U.S.-based manufacturer RTI was selected by Airbus to produce the 3D-printed pylon components for the A320neo jetliners.
U.S.-based manufacturer RTI was selected by Airbus to produce the 3D-printed pylon components for the A320neo jetliners.

Airbus is using additive manufacturing (AM) to produce components for the pylon of its A320neo developmental aircraft.

U.S.-based manufacturer RTI was selected by Airbus to produce the 3D-printed pylon components for the A320neo jetliners and supplied parts in three months – less than half the time that would be required for their production by traditional casting methods, Airbus says.

‘In developing two different pylons for the A320neo Family’s new engine options over a short period of time, we needed to find innovative solutions,’ said Helene Lagier, Airbus’ standard parts customer team leader. ‘3D printing technology has great potential and will be used more and more in future aircraft.’

The aeroplane is powered by CFM International’s LEAP-1A, is one of two new-generation engine choices for the single-aisle NEO Family, along with the PurePower PW1100G-JM from Pratt & Whitney.

This story is reprinted from material from Airbus, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier.