Interbody fusion devices incorporating complex porous features, printed in Ti6AI4V on a 3D Systems 3D printing machine.
Interbody fusion devices incorporating complex porous features, printed in Ti6AI4V on a 3D Systems 3D printing machine.

3D Systems says that three companies have acquired its 3D printing software and machines.

Telecommunications company Nokia has acquired 3D Systems’ Figure 4 plastic additive manufacturing (AM) system, while rms Company, which helps machine medical devices, has expanded its use of 3D Systems’ direct metal printing (DMP) platform for new applications.  GF Precicast, which makes parts for aerospace and industrial gas turbine (IGT), has also integrated 3D Systems’ metal AM platform as an alternative to investment casting of alloys.

‘We made the decision to integrate metal additive manufacturing into our service offering,’ said Lee Zachman, president of rms Company. ‘Our customers require products that can only be manufactured with additive technology, and we’ve made the investments necessary to support them. [..] We see continued growth in the metals additive space and are committed to this technology.’ 

‘We’ve seen great success incorporating [3D printing systems] into our production workflow to produce structural components,’ said Paolo Gennaro, managing director, GF Precicast Additive SA. ‘We're in the process of certifying these components produced with additive technology, using super alloys that are able to improve performance while reducing costs.’

This story uses material from 3D Systems, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier.