A CEM process 3D-printed coolant manifold made of PPS GF 40 Fortron 1140L4 injection molding pellets.
A CEM process 3D-printed coolant manifold made of PPS GF 40 Fortron 1140L4 injection molding pellets.

AIM3D, which makes multi-material 3D printers, has developed a new range of print heads for its composite extrusion modelling (CEM) process. The CEM-E2 extruder can print metal, plastic and ceramics and has four different print heads depending on whether metal, plastic or ceramic pellets are being processed.

According to the company, the new heads have improved accuracy, helping enable a higher surface quality and better mechanical properties of the component. Extrusion speed has been increased by more than 200%, with manufacturing rates of up to 220 cm³/h with a 0.4 mm nozzle.

‘The material feed as well as an optional water cooling system and an improved holder for the quick-change system are all new developments,’ said Clemens Lieberwirth, CTO at AIM3D. ‘The patented CEM-E2 extruder with its parameters tailored to specific materials sets new standards in the CEM processes.’

This story uses material from AIM3D, with editorial changes made by Materials Today.