Carbon news, September 2015

Growing graphene on a liquid layers enables the production of high quality, large single crystals.

Japanese arts of origami (paper folding) and kirigami (paper cutting) inspire scientists and engineers to make graphene into three-dimensional structures.

Canadian physicists have produced superconducting graphene for the first time, by coating it with lithium atoms.

A new one-step process can make carbon-based nanomaterials that possess superior physical properties in three dimensions.

Theoretical calculations suggest that the properties of atom-thick sheets of boron depend on where those atoms are deposited.

The inner space of carbon nanotubes can act as a template for the synthesis of nanodiamond-like carbon chains.

By finding a way to get metal-organic frameworks to melt, scientists have developed a novel type of glass.

A novel molecular system can both absorb carbon dioxide and selectively reduce it to carbon monoxide.

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