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Carbon news, January 2018

Nanotechnology limits on carbon nanotubes.

Chemists put a novel twist on carbon nanotube fibers

Twisting films of carbon nanotubes produces short lengths of strong, conductive fibers in about an hour, making this process much faster than spinning.

Cleaning nanotubes through heat and ion bombardment.

Using carbon nanotubes and modified graphene nano ribbons in fuel cells.

A nanostructure made from a fluoropolymer and metal oxide materials allows thin-film transistors to operate with unprecedented stability.

A crystal with an exterior case surrounding a rotating axis is the first proof that a single material can be both static and moving, or amphidynamic.

An innovative platinum and copper alloy catalyst can convert methane from shale gas into hydrocarbon fuels without becoming coated in carbon.

Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes or modified graphene nanoribbons could replace the platinum cathodes that currently reduce oxygen in fuel cells.

The topological insulator trisodium bismuthide can be as electronically smooth as the highest-quality graphene-based devices.

A novel method for removing contaminants from carbon nanotubes has helped to reveal why their electrical properties are so difficult to measure.

Applying pressure at the nanoscale to two layers of graphene transforms them into a super-hard, diamond-like material, termed diamene.

A method for encapsulating metals such as dysprosium and copper in a single layer of graphene could produce materials with novel properties.

Read our latest series and find out about materials science researchers in New Zealand and Australia.

Scientists have engineered ‘artificial graphene’ by replicating, for the first time, the electronic structure of graphene with semiconducting materials.

Adding water to asphalt-derived porous carbon produces a material that can adsorb more than two times its weight of carbon dioxide.

Two-step thermal reduction process boosts conductivity and mobility of reduced graphene oxide (RGO), opening up new potential applications.

Adding a tiny amount of boron to a carbon-containing plasma can alter the grain size and electrical properties of the diamond film produced by the plasma.

Scientists have developed a new method for produce semiconducting graphene nanoribbons by heating a specially-prepared polymer.

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