There is reportedly a need for lightweight parts in both internal combustion and electric motor-based drivetrains.
There is reportedly a need for lightweight parts in both internal combustion and electric motor-based drivetrains.

Thermoset companies Vyncolit NV and Sumitomo Bakelite Co Ltd say there is a pressing need for lightweight parts in both internal combustion and electric motor-based drivetrains. The companies suggest that using composites will be key to making this happen.

The subject was discussed during the Lightweight Composite Solutions Conference which reportedly took place in in Ghent, Belgium in April 2018.  

The switch to Vyncolit NV and Sumitomo Bakelite Co Ltd. plastics and materials in parts such as fuel pumps, electric motor housing and brake system parts could dramatically reduce weights and costs, the companies say.

‘Powertrains, be they conventional, hybrid or fully electric, will need to be light in weight if carmakers are to meet the stringent regulations on carbon dioxide emissions (CO2) to come into force in 2025 – and composites will be key to making this happen,’ a press release said.

In Europe, the fleet average emissions to be achieved by all new cars in 2021 is 95 grams of CO2 per km. By 2025, this could be reduced further to 75 grams of CO2 per km. The average emissions level of a new car sold in 2016 was 118.1 grams of CO2 per km.

‘All OEMs, have a lot of work to do in the next six to seven years,’ said MD of Vyncolit NV, Pieter Vanderstraeten. ‘Lightweighting will be key in hitting these targets, regardless of the drivetrains employed. For electric vehicles, there are few standard technologies and limited means for the true mass production of electric motors. The need for regenerative technologies, small city cars and autonomous vehicles will change the requirements of braking technologies. All of these present opportunities for lightweight composite solutions.’

This story uses material from Sumitomo Bakelitewith editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier.