Materials specialist Low & Bonar has developed an underlay for hard surface flooring created by sandwiching the thermoplastic honeycomb core with a non-woven material. (Photo courtesy Low & Bonar.)
Materials specialist Low & Bonar has developed an underlay for hard surface flooring created by sandwiching the thermoplastic honeycomb core with a non-woven material. (Photo courtesy Low & Bonar.)

EconCore, which makes thermoplastic honeycomb core technology, has announced new licensees, covering automotive interiors and a flooring solution for building applications.

One licensee, Japanese automotive tier one supplier Kotobukiya Fronte, currently uses the honeycomb technology for automotive interiors. By producing rigid panels, with in-line lamination of nonwoven and carpet surface layers, it enables a more efficient production process of finished automotive interior elements, EconCore said.

The other company, materials specialist Low & Bonar, has developed an underlay for hard surface flooring created by sandwiching the thermoplastic honeycomb core with a non-woven material. This gives the product a high compressive strength, as well as improved acoustic absorption and insulation properties.

‘The technology opens the way for product developments that are cost effective, strong and at the same time lightweight and can be made on a continuous production line,’ said Dr Jochen Pflug, CEO of EconCore.

This story uses material from EconCore, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier.