The aim of the testing was to check the integrity of the structures of the composite parts on-board the monohull.
The aim of the testing was to check the integrity of the structures of the composite parts on-board the monohull.

French testing company Institut de Soudure and Composite Integrity have just carried out non-destructive testing on the composites used in IMOCA, a new Open 60 monohull to be piloted by Arnaud Boissières, skipper and holder of the French SNSM lifesaving record.

The aim of the testing was to check the condition of the materials in order to ensure human safety and the integrity of the structures of the composite parts on-board the monohull. For three days, a team of controllers from Groupe Institut de Soudure and Composite Integrity concentrated on the mast, the rudders and the boom, as well as on the reinforcing elements in the inner hull.

After removing the 27 m long mast and transporting it to the workshop it was examined at 700 different points. The boom and the rudders were also inspected. ‘The boat undergoes an ultrasonic scan to ensure there is no pre-damage,’ explained Jérôme Raynal, sales director of Composite Integrity. Tap tests were also carried out to detect any faults in the glued assemblies. 

This story is reprinted from material from Composite Integrity with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier.