The lightweight FRP decks allowed contractors to use the original steel trusses.
The lightweight FRP decks allowed contractors to use the original steel trusses.

Composite Advantage has installed fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) panels on two pedestrian overpasses in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, replacing heavy, decaying concrete.

According to the company, the north entrance pedestrian bridge deck consists of 11 FRP panels with a total length of 138 ft, while the South entrance bridge deck, comprising 33 panels, has a total length of 394 ft and includes 90-degree turns.

The lightweight FRP decks allowed contractors to use the original steel trusses, minimizing the repair and labor costs associated with steel upgrades, Composites Advantage said.

‘Access to the work site was limited,’ says Scott Reeve, marketing director for Composite Advantage. ‘It was difficult to maneuver the FRP panels into place, but pre-cast concrete would have been prohibitive. Aside from problems with ingress, it would have taken longer to pour concrete and caused additional disruption and downtime for the rail station.’

This story uses material from Composite Advantage, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier.