All Backdraft replicas have a glass fiber main body, spray molded in one piece on a rotating jig, using a matched Crystic resin and gelcoat.
All Backdraft replicas have a glass fiber main body, spray molded in one piece on a rotating jig, using a matched Crystic resin and gelcoat.

Scott Bader says that its tooling, tooling, laminating and structural adhesive products are used to make glass fiber replicas of 1960 racing cars.

According to Scott Bader, while the original cars have an aluminum body, the replicas are manufactured with a more lightweight, strong, durable, glass fiber body. The main body section is mouded in one piece on a rotating jig, with separate tooling for the doors, hood, truck and various interior parts, and the glass fiber components are made of pre-accelerated unsaturated polyester (UP) matched Crystic resin and gelcoat systems. The glass fiber laminate system for the entire main body is a spray applied combination of black pigmented Crystic LS 97PA gelcoat, with three layers of 450 gsm chopped strand matting with Crystic 491PAT isophthalic back up resin, which is thixotropic and so can be sprayed or brushed, Scott Bader said. For certain areas a core mat reinforcing layer is added, with extra glass reinforcement in the wheel arches.

The individual glass fiber body parts, such as the doors, hood and trunk, are all molded by hand lay-up, double skinned, with steel inserts in the hinge and lock areas for added durability and strength, with Crystic 491PAT laminating resin brush applied behind a black Crystic LS88PA gelcoat, according to the company. The door surrounds, hood and luggage compartment surrounds and other strategic points are reinforced by applying a chopped fiber compound and an extra layer of glass mat, while the cockpit floor, transmission tunnel, fire wall, front inner wheel wells and the luggage compartment are all laminated into the main body moulding in a jig, Scott Bader says. The engine bay and front inner bumpers are also finished in black Crystic LS88PA gelcoat.

This story uses material from Scott Bader, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier.