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Crystalline CHANGE TOPIC

Crystalline materials news, November 2018

A novel X-ray analysis technique has revealed the mechanisms behind resistance at the electrode-electrolyte interface in all-solid-state batteries.

A new class of carbides containing five different metallic elements are predicted to be among the hardest materials with the highest melting points.

A silicon photonic crystal with topological geometry can transmit light round corners with virtually no loss at smaller scales than ever before.

Could a new exfoliation method offer a practical route to large-scale production of nanosheets?

better understanding of stability of perovskites will aid application in large-area or flexible solar energy systems

Find out the recipients of the 2018 Extreme Mechanics Letters Young Investigator Award.

Scientists have dramatically improved the response of graphene to light by self-assembling a mesh of polymer nanowires that conduct electricity.

Scientists have adapted a cryogenic electron microscopy imaging technique to obtain an image of atomic-scale structure in a synthetic polymer.

Varying the spacing between twin boundaries can dramatically improve a metal's strength and the extent to which it strengthens when deformed.

A new machine learning algorithm predicted the properties of more than 100,000 compounds in order to find efficient phosphors for LED lighting.

Scientists have confirmed that hafnium oxide is ferroelectric at the nanoscale, as a result of pressure-induced changes in its crystal arrangement.

Scientists have identified a new class of topological materials made by inserting transition metal atoms into the atomic lattice of niobium disulfide.

Using nanopillars made from a high-entropy alloy, scientists have been able to study how dislocations organize and interact at the nanoscale.

two-dimensional boron – or borophene – accommodates line defects in a unique way

boron arsenide (BAs) has unusually high thermal conductivity, which could help keep the next generation of electronic and optoelectronic devices cooler

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