Crystalline CHANGE TOPIC

Crystalline materials news, March 2019

Researchers have found a layered material made from sodium, tin and arsenic that can act as both an electron-holder and a hole-holder.

By exciting ‘frustrated’ crystalline materials with laser light, a team of researchers has managed to transform them into a stable ‘supercrystal’.

A new microfluidic system for synthesizing perovskite quantum dots reduces manufacturing costs and can be tuned on demand to any color.

Researchers have discovered the strongest topological conductor yet, in the form of thin crystal samples with a spiral-staircase structure.

fast-screening of potential non-noble metal two-dimensional catalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction

Scientists have discovered the islands that form a new layer in a crystalline material tend to form in a pattern similar to the preceding layer.

A metal-organic framework proved better at soaking up the pollutant PFOS from contaminated water when it contained additional nanometer-sized holes.

A novel type of polymer can alter its thermal conductivity by switching between a crystalline state and a liquid state in response to light.

Scientists have used a new technique called ultrafast surface X-ray scattering to visualize the motion of atoms in a 2D material.

Physicists have discovered that placing 2D semiconductors on top of each other and twisting them causes the emergence of novel hybrid properties.

Novel simulations show that atom-sized steps on a substrate have the remarkable ability to keep monolayer crystal islands in alignment as they grow.

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