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Crystalline CHANGE TOPIC

Crystalline materials news, October 2019

Scientists have discovered that chains of atoms can dash around at lightning speeds inside the cubic phase of pure titanium.

Electric current can simultaneously flow clockwise and counterclockwise in a ring of a polycrystalline material made from bismuth and palladium.

Scientists have produced a heavy fermion material with superconducting regions coexisting alongside regions in a normal metallic state.

A novel mathematical approach based on graph theory can predict which pairs of zeolite types can be transformed from one to the other.

Researchers have developed an artificial, layered crystal composed of the elements lanthanum, titanium, cobalt and oxygen in atom-thick sheets.

By simply adding a trace amount of copper, scientists have created the strongest ever silver without reducing its electrical conductivity.

Scientists have discovered that the magic angle at which two layers of graphene become superconducting is slightly wider than originally thought.

Researchers have found that a crystal made of cobalt, manganese and gallium is a room-temperature topological magnet that hosts quantum loops.

Crystallographic dislocations can impact the ability of halide perovskites to hold energy derived from light in the form of excited electrons.

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