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Electronic properties news, June 2022

A novel method for growing thin-films of barium titanate with few defects could lead to more energy efficient electronic devices.

Puzzling over disorder in 2D materials

Using a kind of puzzle-solving process, researchers have pieced together a method to determine how different 2D materials respond to disorder.

Using piezoelectric metamaterials, researchers have created 3D-printed 'meta-bots' capable of propulsion, movement, sensing and decision-making.

By combining semiconductors with flexible polymers, researchers have created a thermoelectric coating for converting low-grade heat into electrical power.

Researchers have developed a polymer surface that can switch betweeen capturing and releasing biomolecules in response to an electrical signal.

Unique properties of 2D materials stressed by contoured substrates

Researchers have discovered that the dielectric constant of their strontium titanate films exceeds 25,000 – the highest ever measured for this material.

Using computer modelling, researchers have predicted the existence of a new layered form of carbon they call 'amorphous graphite'.

green-solvent-processable, open-air printable self-assembly strategy for fabricating stable, efficient OSCs

light-triggered shape-changing device that could serve as a power source for soft robotics

Using computational and experimental methods, researchers have compared the superconducting properties of layered nickelates and cuprates.

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