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Energy news, February 2019

Perspectives on the materials research landscape

Two new reports, now available for download.

Scientists strain to produce better catalytic nanosheets

Scientists have shown that applying strain to thin metal sheets can increase their catalytic ability by 10 to 20 times.

An anode made from a combination of silicon and the 2D material MXene could extend the life of lithium-ion batteries by as much as five times.

Switching on rechargeable sodium batteries

For the first time, researchers have used block copolymers to produce carbon fibers with uniformly sized and spaced pores for energy storage.

Combining porous carbon fibers with manganese oxide produces a supercapacitor with high energy density and high charge-discharge rates.

Faster batteries through X-ray insights

A layer of red phosphorus on the separator in lithium metal batteries can signal when damaging dendrites threaten to create a short circuit

Researchers have used an X-ray technique to quantify the amount of lithium in different regions of a battery anode during charging and discharging.

Elsevier and the International Solar Energy Society are pleased to announce that the 2nd Renewable Transformation Challenge.

A ruthenium-based catalyst shows markedly better performance than commercial platinum catalysts at splitting water for hydrogen production.

antimony-doped tin oxide nanoparticles improve environmental durability and heat retaining properties of transparent wood

Researchers have uncovered the mechanisms that lead to improved performance when alkali metal is added to traditional perovskites.

new type of electric field effect can control light emission from perovskite devices

A nanomechanical device equipped in SEM was creatively designed to achieve quantitative in-situ tensile test of individual SnO2 NWs.

Researchers have used 2D materials to create the first fully flexible, battery-free ‘rectenna’ for converting energy from Wi-Fi signals into electricity.

Increasing the pressure on a superconducting bismuth material can cause its transition temperature to increase after initially dropping.

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