Materials Today is delighted to announce that the 2020 Materials Today Innovation Award will be presented to Prof Michael Grätzel (École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne) for his ground-breaking work on solar energy conversion.

Please join us for the virtual presentation on Thursday 10th December 2020 at 2pm GMT (UK), 3pm CET (Europe), 10pm CST (China), 9am EST (US East Coast), 6am PST (US West Coat).

In addition to the Awards, the live session will feature a plenary presentation from Prof Michael Grätzel, as well as invited presentations from the winners of the 2020 Materials Today Rising Star Awards. The winners of  the 2020 Materials Today Rising Star Awards in the fields of Quantum Materials, Energy Conversion, Energy Storage, Biomaterials will be announced live during the session.

The Materials Today Innovation Award recognizes “monumental” work, which has opened a new, significant field of research and resulted in impactful, practical applications. Previous winners include Nobel Laureatte Prof M Stanley Whittingham (Binghamton University) and Prof Russell Dupuis (Georgia Tech) for their work on Li-ion batteries and MO-CVD respectively.

To register to attend, simply log in/register to your Material Today website account below, and confirm your attendance. 

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TITLE: The Genesis and Rise of Perovskite Solar Cells

AWARD WINNER: Prof Michael Graetzel, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne  Switzerland

ABSTRACT: Over the last 10 years perovskite solar cells (PSCs) have emerged as credible contenders to conventional p-n junction photovoltaics. Their certified power conversion efficiency currently attains 25.5 %, exceeding that of the market leader polycrystalline silicon. This lecture summarizes the genesis and recent evolution of PSCs, describing their operational principles, current performance and challenges that still need to be met to implement PSCs on a large commercial scale. PSCs can produce high photovoltages rendering them attractive for applications in tandem cells, e.g. with silicon and for the generation of fuels from sunlight. Examples are the solar generation of hydrogen from water and the reduction of CO2 mimicking natural photosynthesis.

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