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Mechanical CHANGE TOPIC

Mechanical properties news, March 2017

A new imaging technique can visualize the evolution of micro- and nanoscale structures on a material's surface after irradiation with a laser beam.

Specially selected papers from Applied Materials Today

To celebrate the latest CiteScoreTracker value of 5.57, the Editor-in-Chief highlights three key articles.

Metals with a gradient in grain size show increased overall strength while allowing ductile behavior to take place to avoid catastrophic failure.

3D printing with cellulose made easier and cheaper.

Researchers have found a way to greatly reduce the effects of fatigue in steel by incorporating a laminated nanostructure.

Cellulose could offer a renewable, biodegradable alternative to the polymers currently for 3D printing, thanks to a novel 3D printing process.

Researchers have found a way to remotely control the order in which a 2D sheet folds itself into a 3D structure using different wavelengths of light.

A portable device for fabricating aligned nanofibers could be used to dress wounds on a battlefield or dress shoppers in customizable fabrics.

Nanocrystalline doped ceramic oxide with zero-energy grain boundaries is as stable as bulk material.

The deadline is Monday 13 March 2017.

A new bioinspired technique can transform silk protein into complex materials that are easily programmable at the nano-, micro- and macro-scales.

The deadline is Monday 13 March 2017.

Materials that mimic the biological and physical properties of heart valve tissue could help repair and regenerate damaged or diseased valves

The micro-looping technique used by brown recluse spiders to produce very strong silk could increase the strength of synthetic materials.

The first nonreciprocal mechanical metamaterial can easily transfer motion effortlessly in one direction while blocking it in the other.

Conductive graphene foam reinforced by carbon nanotubes can support more than 3000 times its own weight and easily bounce back to its original height.

A new method for healing low-quality diamond nanocrystals under high-temperature conditions could lead to their use in quantum sensing.

A new, thermally-conductive rubber material could represent a breakthrough for creating soft, stretchable machines and electronics.

A new family of highly stretchable and UV curable elastomers can be stretched by up to 1100%, making them suitable for 3D printing techniques.

A highly porous ceramic foam ink helps control structure of 3D printed materials.

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