Haydale, a developer of graphene and nanoparticulate materials, has recently been awarded a number of research grants totalling over £450,000.

The projects relating to each grant are expected to run for a period of between 18 to 24 months.

 These new projects include:

The development of low cost, self-cleaning graphene enhanced coatings for industrial membranes used in the cleaning and filtering of wastewater, swimming pools, desalination and offshore drilling fluids, amongst others as part of the project recently announced by G20 Water. The project’s target sectors of nanofiltration from reverse osmosis (RO) and ultrafiltration accounted for US$1.7 billion of sales in 2014.

The feasibility of developing type V liner-less thermoplastic composite hydrogen pressure vessels for hydrogen powered fuel cell vehicles. If it can be demonstrated that it is feasible to manufacture liner-less functionalised graphene enhanced thermoplastic composite pressure vessels with improved permeation resistance, this could lead to lighter, cheaper and safer hydrogen pressure vessels on vehicles. Research by UK H2 Mobility predicts that 10,000 Hydrogen vehicles will be sold by 2020, with an estimated annual market for storage vessels of £21 million.

A consulting assignment to review and advise on the transfer of aerospace led materials research into non-aerospace applications. This has been awarded as part of the Dual-Use Technology Exploitation (DUTE) Innovation Cluster.

Product development

‘The support of government is vital in accelerating the commercialisation of graphene based composite products,’ said Ray Gibbs, Haydale chief executive. ‘The awards also enable us to engage directly with prime OEMs in the significant aerospace, automotive, rail and marine markets as well as enabling us to expand our technical team and capabilities in this area.’
‘We have a well-defined product development strategy and are committed to developing graphene enhanced polymer and polymer composite products in targeted markets including aerospace, automotive, rail and marine,’ said Gerry Boyce, MD of subsidiary Haydale Composite Solutions.
 

This story is reprinted from material from Haydale, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier.