Molybdenum use remained buoyant throughout 2013, says the IMOA.
Molybdenum use remained buoyant throughout 2013, says the IMOA.

The full year figures also show global molybdenum use at 537.7 million lbs, breaking the previous year’s record high of 522.5 million lbs.

The greatest usage of molybdenum in 2013 was in China, where use increased from 188.4 million lbs in 2012 to 196.2 million lbs in 2013. Europe recorded the second biggest share with 140.4 million lbs, up from 135.9 million lbs in 2012. Japan and USA were the third and fourth largest users of molybdenum by region, recording 57.4 and 56.1 million lbs respectively. Usage in the CIS was 23 million lbs, with other countries togethertotalling 64.6 million lbs.

China was also the biggest molybdenum producing area in 2013, although output fell slightly to 194.9 million lbs, compared to the previous year’s record high of 207 million lbs. Production in North America rose from 176.5 million lbs in 2012 to 180.5 million lbs in 2013. South America was the third largest producing region, accounting for 128 million lbs in 2013, up from 118.7 in 2012. Production in other countries increased slightly from 33 to 35.7 million lbs in 2013.

Increase in South America

New figures for the fourth quarter of 2013, also released, saw total molybdenum production rise from 134.9 million lbs in Q3 to 141.4 in Q4. China’s molybdenum production increased slightly from 49.7 in the third quarter of 2013 to 51.2 million lbs in Q4. North American production fell slightly, from 44.5 million lbs in Q3 to 43.2 in Q4. Production in South America increased from 31.7 million lbs in Q3 to 38.1 in Q4.

Global usage increased from 137.5 million lbs in Q3 to 138.2 in Q4. Usage in China decreased slightly from 52.9 million lbs in Q3 to 51.6 in Q4. Usage in Europe increased 34 million lbs in Q3 to 35.1 in Q4. Japan and USA used 14.4 and 14.2 million lbs respectively in Q4.

“These figures indicate that molybdenum use remained buoyant throughout 2013, with production keeping pace or slightly exceeding demand,” said Tim Outteridge, IMOA’s secretary-general. Figures for both production and use reached new highs once again in 2013.”