Kartik Rao, business development director at Metalysis, looking at a 3D printed part made from Metalysis powder.
Kartik Rao, business development director at Metalysis, looking at a 3D printed part made from Metalysis powder.

The awards recognise achievements across a wide-range of industries and disciplines. The judges look at examples of best practice companies, products, processes, and executives that have.

Metalysis says that it won the award because of its contribution to metal 3D printing, developing a low cost titanium powder that can be processed in just one step, directly from ore. The company’s low-cost titanium powder is opening up the possibility of titanium 3D printed parts in new industries such as automotive and aerospace.

“We are thrilled to see Metalysis’ technology recognised by the Frost & Sullivan Best Practice Awards for its potential to transform manufacturing with 3D printed metal parts,” said Dion Vaughan, CEO of Metalysis.