Höganäs has received conditional approval by the California Environmental Protection Agency.
Höganäs has received conditional approval by the California Environmental Protection Agency.

Höganäs says that is has received conditional approval by the California Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for its Cleanit LC technology, a process solution which aimes to remove contaminants such as hexavalent chromium, arsenic, lead, selenium, phosphates and radioactive isotopes from drinking water. Following independent evaluation of a two-phase conditional acceptance challenge study, California’s EPA determined that Höganäs’ Cleanit LC is a cost-effective, safe technology for hexavalent chromium treatment and that it can be used by public water systems in California.

 ‘We’re thrilled to receive conditional approval from the California EPA for Cleanit LC, one of the most difficult approvals to seek from the globally respected agency,’ said Avinash Gore, president of Höganäs’ environmental business area. ‘This proclamation enables Höganäs to further share its technology with cities in need of innovative solutions to provide clean drinking water to their residents. The maximum contaminant level currently allowed by regulation is 50 ppb and we consistently demonstrated zero ppb. Our future proof technology can cover any and all standards that may emerge in the next 20 to 50 years, and our next steps are to pursue a couple commercial plants and installations in progress toward unconditional approval.’

 The company’s Cleanit LC technology compriseS a zero valent iron media. The porous iron composite material exhibits higher reactivity than other zero valence iron media and reportedly consumes less energy, offering 100% environmentally friendly technology at an attractive lifecycle cost. Cleanit LC is already NSF/ANSI Standard 61 approved, and it can be retrofitted into an existing water treatment system.

This story is reprinted from material from Höganäs, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier.