Inspired by a lack of answers to his questions during a summer internship as a student, Iver E. Anderson has carved out a long and successful career finding answers to fundamental questions in powder metallurgy and putting those answers into action in real processes. Anderson believes that powder metallurgy offers a sustainable route to using recycled metals and alloys, as well as making the most of diminishing resources. In this issue of Metal Powder Report, Iver E. Anderson discusses his work and how powder metallurgy can keep advanced manufacturing a vital sector in the US economy with Cordelia Sealy.

Iver E. Anderson is currently Senior Metallurgist in the Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering at Ames Laboratory (USDOE), where he has worked for over quarter of century, and an Adjunct Professor in Materials Science and Engineering at Iowa State University. His research in powder metallurgy and rapid solidification, particularly high-pressure gas atomization of fine metal powders and powder processing of magnetic materials, structural components, lightweight and porous materials, as well as lead-free solders and ceramic joining, has yielded over 170 publications, 36 patents, and many awards including the TMS Fellow Award (2015), Iowa Inventor of the Year and Fellow of APMI International (2006), Energy 100 Award (2001), TMS Distinguished Service Award (1996), and R&D-100 Award and Federal Laboratory Consortium Award for Excellence in Technology Transfer (1991).

His scientific career began at the University of Wisconsin with a PhD in Metallurgical Engineering (1982). He then worked at Naval Research Laboratory for five years before joining Ames Laboratory in 1987. Although very much still an active researcher, Anderson has also found time to serve as president of the Federation of Materials Societies (2002–2004), on the board of directors of The Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society (2005–2008) and American Powder Metallurgy Institute International (2001–2005), and is currently a trustee of ASM International.

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