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Metals and alloys news, September 2020

Scientists have used artificial intelligence to identify a novel class of cheap, stable solid electrolyte materials made from lithium, boron and sulfur.

NICE coating lights up medical devices

NIR dye-polymer fluorescent coating helps surgeons visualize medical devices in the body

By studying how strontium ruthenate responds to sound waves, researchers have discovered it may be a new type of superconductor known as g-wave.

Researchers have found that aluminum nanoparticles with sharper corners are better able to utilize light to catalyze chemical reactions.

Researchers have discovered that an alloy of manganese, ruthenium and gallium can act as a super-fast magnetic switch.

Researchers have confirmed that tiny sub-nanoparticles created via the atom hybridization method can make highly efficient catalysts.

A novel optical detection system may have shown that grain boundaries are no barrier for thermoelectrical materials, but they still can't take the strain.

Researchers have uncovered the atomic mechanism that makes tin-based thermoelectric materials incredibly efficient at high temperatures.

Researchers have replicated a famous painting by shining white light on a glass slide stippled with millions of titanium dioxide nanopillars.

Using liquid metal particles, researchers can make perfectly molded metallic versions of natural surfaces such as a rose petal.

Researchers have found a way to get nanoclusters of copper molecules to self-assemble so they can mimic biomolecules such as DNA and proteins.

Adding a layer of a noble metal to the surface of a semiconducting crystal changes its structure and gives it completely novel electric properties.

By combing organic molecules with silver electrodes, researchers have set a new efficiency record for color-neutral, transparent solar cells.

new form of lithography can produce extremely sharp bowtie nanoantennas for improved plasmonics

By utilizing zinc oxide fins, researchers have produced LEDs that can generate about 100 to 1000 times as much power as typical tiny LEDs.

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