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Nanomaterials news, January 2018

Plant-inspired ‘nanowrinkles’ too slippery for marine bacteria

Inspired by the pitcher plant, scientists have shown that a surface coating of 'nanowrinkles' on polymers can prevent biofouling by marine bacteria.

Nanotechnology limits on carbon nanotubes.

Scientists have witnessed the concentration of lithium inside individual nanoparticles in a battery electrode reverse during power generation.

Twisting films of carbon nanotubes produces short lengths of strong, conductive fibers in about an hour, making this process much faster than spinning.

Incorporating hexagonal boron nitride between layers of calcium silicate should produce a tough, durable ceramic that is resistant to heat and radiation.

Cleaning nanotubes through heat and ion bombardment.

Using carbon nanotubes and modified graphene nano ribbons in fuel cells.

A nanostructure made from a fluoropolymer and metal oxide materials allows thin-film transistors to operate with unprecedented stability.

Photocatalyst based on titanium dioxide can turn carbon dioxide into usable fuel and reduce atmospheric carbon dioxide.

New technique offers strong and resilient ultrafine polymer fibers with a range of applications.

Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes or modified graphene nanoribbons could replace the platinum cathodes that currently reduce oxygen in fuel cells.

A novel process called gel electrospinning can produce ultrafine polymer fibers that are exceptionally strong and tough.

By conducting systematic studies, researchers have provided a quantitative picture of how surface conditions control the growth of metal nanocrystals.

Researchers have developed the first single metalens able to focus the entire visible spectrum of light in the same spot and in high resolution.

A novel method for removing contaminants from carbon nanotubes has helped to reveal why their electrical properties are so difficult to measure.

By utilizing flat coils with different shapes, scientists have adapted nuclear magnetic resonance to study nanomaterials and exotic states of matter.

Asymmetrical polymer particles imprinted with DNA are able to bind together in a spatially defined manner for use in biomedicine and 'soft robotics'.

Applying pressure at the nanoscale to two layers of graphene transforms them into a super-hard, diamond-like material, termed diamene.

A method for encapsulating metals such as dysprosium and copper in a single layer of graphene could produce materials with novel properties.

The transfer of energy from nanomaterials to molecules can go both ways, causing the nanomaterials to photoluminesce over long timescales.

Read our latest series and find out about materials science researchers in New Zealand and Australia.

Jellyfish-inspired triboelectric nanogenerator can harvest energy from waves and power sensors that can detect fluctuations in the water surface.

Scientists have engineered ‘artificial graphene’ by replicating, for the first time, the electronic structure of graphene with semiconducting materials.

Adding water to asphalt-derived porous carbon produces a material that can adsorb more than two times its weight of carbon dioxide.

A nanotextured surface on a stainless steel alloy, produced by an electrochemical etching process, can kill bacteria while not harming mammalian cells.

Researchers have found a simple way to deposit magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles onto silica-coated gold nanorods for biomedical applications.

A new hyperlens crystal made from hexagonal boron nitride with isotopically pure boron can resolve features as small as 30nm in size.

Improved DNA detection using nanopore sensors.

Two-step thermal reduction process boosts conductivity and mobility of reduced graphene oxide (RGO), opening up new potential applications.

Fabrication of the first-ever metallic glass nanotube arrays on a Si substrate by a simple lithography and sputter deposition process.

Novel bioactive nanocomposite hydrogel based on hyaluronic acid and self-assembled bisphosphonate-magnesium nanoparticles facilitates bone regeneration.

Adding a tiny amount of boron to a carbon-containing plasma can alter the grain size and electrical properties of the diamond film produced by the plasma.

Scientists have developed a new method for produce semiconducting graphene nanoribbons by heating a specially-prepared polymer.

Scientists have determined the mechanisms that cause tiny wires of molybdenum disulfide to extend into tungsten diselenide at their interface.

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