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Nanomaterials news, June 2018

Silicon stealth sheet can hide objects from prying infrared eyes

A new cloaking material made from silicon nanowires can absorb approximately 94% of the infrared light it encounters.

Graphene film can have higher thermal conductivity than graphite film

A novel graphene-assembled film possesses higher thermal conductivity than graphite film, even though graphite consists of many layers of graphene.

Scientists have discovered that reactive elements and water combine to create a fast-growing, nanocrystalline oxide scale on high-temperature alloys.

Researchers have used nano-discs made of 2D boron nitride to squeeze infrared light into ultra-confined spaces and create a nanoscale antenna.

A new cathode material comprising iron trifluoride nanorods with added cobalt and oxygen could triple the energy density of lithium-ion batteries.

A novel composite made of hydrogel and a 2D material can conduct electricity, stretch by more than 3400%, self-heal and adhere to many surfaces.

Platinum nanoparticles can lower the impedance of graphene electrodes while keeping them transparent for recording neuronal activity.

Scientists have developed a simple way to produce a conductive graphene foam that they can shape into 3D objects such as battery electrodes.

Elsevier releases 2017 CiteScore values.

Using novel analytical techniques, scientists have been able to study the behavior of excitons trapped in quantum wells made of perovskite compounds.

Living systems can be used to build the new world of nanotechnology.

Neural networks can predict the light-scattering properties of layered nanoparticles and design nanoparticles for a desired light-scattering behavior.

Scientists have found that the most effective thermoelectric materials can be realized by shaping substances such as tin telluride into 1D nanowires.

Researchers have developed a new way to grow mineralized materials that could regenerate hard tissues such as dental enamel and bone.

Scientists have trained a neural network to recognize features in a material's x-ray absorption spectrum that are sensitive to the arrangement of atoms.

Scientists have developed a blueprint for fabricating new heterostructures from different types of two-dimensional materials.

A material comprising layers of graphene and magnetic metals like nickel can induce exotic behavior in electrons at the interface between the layers.

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