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Nanomaterials news, January 2019

A new method called thermal scanning probe lithography outperforms standard methods for fabricating metal electrodes on 2D semiconductors.

Researchers have developed a process for growing graphene nanoribbons in both armchair and zig-zag configurations on the same wafer.

Researchers have discovered that layered graphene can exhibit very different properties in humid conditions, due to water seeping between the layers.

clusters of gold nanoparticles promise a new way of treating the debilitating neurodegenerative condition Parkinson’s disease

Textile researchers have found a simple process for coating silk with ZnO

Chemists have found that the void spaces in 2D layers fundamentally changes the strength of the van der Waals forces between the layers.

New generation holograms hard to counterfeit

Nanoparticles made from cellulose acetate are promising candidate for medical imaging applications

A new catalog details the sizes and shapes of the holes that would most likely be observed in 2D materials when a given number of atoms is removed.

Researchers have shown that a damage-resistant rechargeable zinc battery with a cartilage-like solid electrolyte makes an effective 'structural battery'.

Incorporating advanced catalysts made from 2D materials into lithium-air batteries allows them to hold up to 10 times more energy.

Man-made materials communicate with different cells to promote process of tissue repair

High-energy X-ray beams and a clever experimental setup have allowed researchers to watch the formation of two different cobalt crystals.

A new surface plasmon resonance sensor based on the 2D material antimonene can sensitively detect microRNA associated with cancer.

For the first time, researchers have produced a coherent qubit made from graphene and the 2D material hexagonal boron nitride.

small doses of gold nanoparticles can be broken down by aquatic plants over a period of months

movement of tiny, simple silicon nanomotors in an electric field can be controlled remotely using light

graphene can covert high frequency gigahertz signals into the terahertz range

mushroom-like gold nanowires on soft, flexible substrates could enable a new generation of wearable or implantable stretchable electronic devices

light-emitting diodes based on perovskites that have surpassed a milestone in efficiency

Researchers have found that a quasicrystalline superlattice can self-assemble from a single type of pyramid-shaped nanoparticle building block.

Disordered magnesium chromium oxide crystals just 5nm in size can make an effective cathode material for magnesium batteries.

Pristine graphene formed into geometric shapes such as narrow ribbons connected to wide-open regions can efficiently convert light into electricity.

Researchers have found that the density of intentionally introduced point defects in graphene electrodes is directly proportional to their sensitivity.

A new combinatorial library tool can rapidly test millions (even billions) of nanoparticles to determine which is best for a specific application.

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