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Nanomaterials news, June 2019

Lanthanum strontium manganite can retain its magnetic properties in atomic layers if it is ‘sandwiched’ between layers of a different ceramic oxide.

Bio-mimicry of polar bear fur offers insulation

Biomimicry of polar bear hairs offers synthetic heat insulating material

Antennas made from carbon nanotube films are just as efficient as copper for wireless applications, while also being tougher and more flexible.

A novel platform for altering the properties of a 2D material by putting it under strain could provide the basis for a new kind of nanoscale transistor.

Using a box built from layers of 2D material, researchers have created a tiny optical resonator in which light and matter become one.

nanobelts of the transition metal NbAs show high mobility even when the carrier density is also high

By developing a process for fabricating oxide perovskite crystals in free-standing layers, researchers have produced a new class of 2D material.

The strain created by growing 2D crystals over 3D objects can be used to tailor the crystals' optoelectronic properties.

Chemists have found a way to improve the speed and durability of smart glass by providing a better understanding of how the glass works at the nanoscale.

By incorporating liquid metal droplets into an elastomer, researchers have created a highly stretchable, soft, multi-functional composite.

The electronic properties of the 2D semiconductor tungsten disulfide can be dramatically changed by doping it with carbon-hydrogen molecules.

Nanocubes coated with single-stranded DNA chains assemble into an unusual ‘zigzag’ arrangement that has never been observed before.

A novel two-step, ultra-clean process for fabricating a 2D transistor separates the ‘messy’ fabrication steps from the 2D semiconductor layer.

By permanently stressing graphene with a novel laser technique, researchers have been able to provide it with the largest ever band gap.

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