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Nanomaterials news, January 2020

Scientists have created self-assembled monolayers that are stable in air, made from spherical buckyballs with 'tails' of of ethylene glycol.

Scientists have come up with a new approach to measuring the properties of quantum materials, which they term magneto-elastoresistance (MER).

A new DNA-programmable nanofabrication platform can organize and assemble a variety of different nanomaterials in the same prescribed ways.

A nanoparticle comprising tiny spheres of copper dotted with single atoms of ruthenium makes an effective light-powered catalyst for producing syngas.

For the first time, researchers have been able to grow, image with atomic resolution and investigate the properties of 2D amorphous carbon.

A novel composite material based on a metal-organic framework that can destroy toxic nerve agents has been integrated with textile fibers.

A plant-based adhesive can repair itself if damaged and could be more green than conventional glues

Researchers have developed a new version of the high-pressure carbon monoxide gas-phase process for producing single-walled carbon nanotubes.

Scientists have found a way to study the structure and properties of the underside of a freestanding complex oxide thin film.

A novel polymer sponge covered in nanocrystalline silicon can remove over 90% of oil microdroplets from wastewater within 10 minutes.

nanocrystal core-shell catalyst for fuel cells uses less Pt but drives the oxygen reduction reaction more efficiently and is more durable

2019 Materials Today Innovation Award recognizes the development of high-quality growth methods for III-V compound semiconductor materials

A plastic wrap with a nanostructured, chemically treated surface can repel everything that comes into contact with it, including viruses and bacteria.

Turning natural atomic flaws inside diamond anvils into quantum sensors offers a novel way to study the effects of pressure on materials.

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