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Nanomaterials news, April 2020

Elastomers that replicate complex twisting action just through the use of light

By stretching hexagonal boron nitride, scientists have obtained the largest spectral color-tuning range from an atomically thin quantum system.

Researchers have developed a carbon nanotube-based sensor that can track how plants respond to stresses such as injury, infection and light damage.

data can be written and erased in novel light-emitting hybrid combining bioimaging organic dyes and luminescent solid-state metal clusters

Researchers have discovered that polymers filled with carbon nanotubes could improve how unmanned military vehicles dissipate energy.

Using 3D laser printing, researchers have fabricated plate-based carbon nanolattices that are stronger than diamond.

biocompatible drug-carrying nanofiber that splits into tiny nanoparticles once inside the body could offer a new strategy for anticancer therapy

Researchers have developed an hexagonal silicon-germanium alloy that can emit light, which could prove of great use for photonics.

The coronavirus pandemic highlights the importance of testing for viruses; a simple physical procedure might make it easier, cheaper and quicker

Scientists have created a flexible membrane from a normally brittle complex oxide, and shown that stretching can change its electronic properties.

By using a laser to fabricate nanoscale patterns, researchers could potentially make the surface of metals such as copper lethal to bacteria.

Indium-carbon bonding for catalysis

Researchers have found that crumpling graphene makes it more than 10,000 times more sensitive to DNA by creating electrical ‘hotspots’.

Scientists have developed an artificial photosynthesis system that utilizes nanotubes made of layers of cobalt oxide, silica and titanium dioxide.

Researchers have shown that the crystal structure at the surface of semiconductor materials can make them behave like metals and even superconductors.

Researchers have created a new rubber-like material based on plexiglass that could act as a replacement for human tissue in medical procedures.

Utilizing 'hybrid data', a new analytical technique can improve the estimation of mechanical properties of metallic materials from indention tests.

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