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Nanomaterials news, December 2020

By realizing the quantum anomalous Hall effect in a multilayered insulator, researchers have produced a multilane highway for transporting electrons.

Researchers have discovered that 'weak' Van der Waals interactions are still sufficient to form bumps in rigid silver nanosheets.

Scientists have discovered why an anomalous metallic state appears at the superconductor-insulator transition in 2D superconductors.

Researchers have discovered that the electrons in magic-angle twisted bilayer graphene can create 'topological quantum states'.

Researchers have found that fabric coated with the conductive 2D material MXene is highly effective at blocking electromagnetic waves.

By replicating the design of a mammal bone, researchers have improved the structural integrity of the cathode for a sodium-ion battery.

By using nanosheets and graphene foam in an island-bridge design, researchers have developed stretchable micro-supercapacitor arrays.

Nanomaterial-based device that can heat or cool buildings

Single-walled carbon nanotubes can emit a delayed secondary fluorescence when triggered by a process involving dye molecules and oxygen.

Using triangular-shaped molecular building blocks, researchers have created an ultrathin porous membrane for filtering organic solvents.

A new tool that uses light to map out the electronic structures of 2D crystals could reveal the capabilities of emerging quantum materials.

Researchers have found that their new graphene-based heat pipe is better at cooling electronics and power systems than a copper-based heat pipe.

By switching between two different nanomaterial sheets, engineers have produced a dual-mode heating and cooling device for buildings.

Researchers have used nanosheets to create an inorganic material that can be converted from a hard gel to soft matter by changing the temperature.

Researchers have shown that flexible, ultrathin antennas made by spraying the 2D material MXene perform almost as well as copper antennas.

Researchers have imbued electrons with novel properties by forcing them to travel along a serpentine path in a metal oxide nanowire.

Researchers have developed an ionic liquid forcefield that prevents proteins from binding to and tagging therapeutic nanoparticles.

Researchers have developed a platform that combines a novel electrospray deposition tool with X-ray analysis for studying blended materials.

Researchers have directly visualized quantum dots in bilayer graphene, revealing the shape of the quantum wave function of the trapped electrons.

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