Optical materials news, November 2020

Moths’ eyes inspire design of antireflective coating for solar panels, smartphones and tablet computers

huge changes in permittivity ZnO can be used to control light in advanced optical devices

Researchers have developed a quick and easy method for assessing new compositions of perovskite materials for use in solar cells.

Researchers have found that lead-free perovskite materials are much more effective than conventional perovskites at absorbing indoor light.

Anti-reflective coatings inspired by the biostructure of moth eyes

altering the crystal structure can induce SiGe to emit light efficiently

Researchers have developed a lead-free magnetic double perovskite, which raises the possibility of coupling spintronics with optoelectronics.

Researchers have developed a novel method for replicating the non-reflective nanostructure of moth eyes in molds and films at large scales.

New flexible, large-area organic photodiodes can detect as little as a few hundred thousand photons of visible light every second.

Localized surface plasmons on aluminum nanoparticles can power the conversion of carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide by graphite.

Thursday, Nov. 19, 9am Boston, 2pm London, 3pm Berlin, 6am San Francisco, Honolulu 4am

Theoretical research has revealed that applying pressure to a tiny spot on layers of graphene could help to turn them into 2D diamond, or diamane.

improved photoresponse of vanadium dioxide make it a candidate for photodetectors

Researchers have found that a layered 2D perovskite is adept at storing the valley states of electrons, making it potentially ideal for valleytronics.

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