Optical materials news, December 2021

Researchers have developed a novel low-temperature process for producing a stable black perovskite for use in solar cells.

A novel all-season smart-roof coating, based on vanadium dioxide, can keep homes warm during the winter and cool during the summer.

A novel organic nanocomposite can absorb X-rays and then re-emit the captured energy as light with nearly perfect efficiency.

Researchers have created a polymer-based photodetector that can be stretched by up to 200% without significantly losing its conductivity.

Researchers have developed a simulator that can both predict solar cell efficiency and provide information about what changes will improve it.

Researchers have developed a method for using lasers to modify the properties of materials without producing any excess damaging heat.

Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) can be made ‘active’ by ball milling at extremely low temperatures

By trapping light in tiny crevices of gold, researchers have coaxed molecules to convert invisible infrared light into visible light.

By applying a new strategy for combining carbon-based molecules, researchers developed an organic material that can emit light for over an hour in air.

Researchers have developed a novel electrochromic technology that can interact with both visible light and mid-infrared light for heating and cooling.

A novel imaging technology that compresses light into a tiny spot can reveal previously invisible details about nanomaterials, including colors.

Researchers have used multiple different microscopy techniques to reveal why perovskite materials are so tolerant of defects in their structure.

Sunlight can contract the space between atomic layers in 2D perovskites, improving the material’s photovoltaic efficiency by up to 18%.

Researchers have discovered that firing a brief pulse of mid-infrared laser light at quantum dots can stop them from blinking.

News archive…

Connect with us
Most viewed in optical materials…
News
 

Using thin-film metal oxides and perovskites, researchers have created fuel-producing artificial leaves that are light enough to float on water.

News
 

Using quantum mechanical models, researchers have more accurately predicted how amorphous carbon conducts electricity and absorbs light.

Current research
 

Webinar
 
What’s coming up in optical materials…
24
Oct ’22