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Polymers and soft materials news, October 2016

Researchers have developed a biocompatible and highly stretchable optical fiber made from hydrogel for use as a flexible implant.

Introducing Materials Today Chemistry and Materials Today Energy

The latest members of the journal family, publishing full length original research articles, short communications and reviews.

Find out more about this years Reaxys PhD Prize winners.

New electronic ‘paper’ is flexible, less than 1µm thick and can display a full range of colors, but requires 10 times less energy than a Kindle tablet.

Find out how Materials Today is evolving.

A new technology known as cold sintering process can combine incompatible materials, such as ceramics and plastics, into useful compound materials.

A novel three-in-one instrument can correlate the flowability of soft ‘gooey’ materials with their underlying microstructure and composition.

Reinforcing graphene nanoadditives increase strength of composites.

polymer nanoparticles carrying an immune-suppressing agent administered at the same time as biological drugs can attenuate immune response

By allowing peptides to continuously reorganize their sequences, scientists have produced a range of novel peptide-based materials.

Chitosan biocompatible and biodegradable 3D scaffolds made by flocking.

Graphene-silicone rubber composites self-repair damage like cracks or fractures.

The Editors now welcome comprehensive articles and short communications reporting breakthrough discoveries and major technical achievements.

Read about Kytai Nguyen- the 2016 Embracing Challenge Award winner.

Engineers have developed a new material made from hydroxyapatite and a biocompatible polymer for 3D printing bone implants.

Scientists have used a range of modern materials, including carbon nanotubes, to create ultra-strong, powerful, shape-shifting yarns.

A new material made of tiny cellulose nanofibers could replace potentially harmful absorbent materials in diapers and sanitary products.

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