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Polymers and soft materials news, October 2020

Inspired by snake vision, researchers have developed a mathematical model that reveals how to convert soft structures into pyroelectric materials.

Researchers have trained a neural network to understand which polymer properties arise from different molecular sequences.

Using a magnetic liquid and hydrogels, researchers have demonstrated a new way to rebuild complex body tissues such as cartilage.

By placing tiny aggregates of cells inside yield-stress gels, researchers have shown they can print biological tissue in complex 3D shapes.

Dissipating heat in electronic devices with graphite films

A novel current collector for lithium-ion batteries, comprising a copper-coated polymer, weighs 80% less and can also help prevent battery fires.

polymer scaffolds embedded with magnetic nanoparticles trigger stem cell differentiation and tendon regeneration

Bacterial biofilms can mechanically disrupt tissue means they could damage their host without using toxins

Engineers have developed a method for spraying nanowires made of a plant-based material called methylcellulose onto 3D objects.

Researchers used 3D printing to produce microscopic electronic fibers made from silver and semiconducting polymers for use as novel sensors.

Researchers have developed electronic blood vessels that are flexible and biodegradable by simply rolling up metal-polymer conductor membranes.

light-activated bioadhesive bonds tissue together in wet or dry conditions

By using chelating ligands to incorporate metal ions into elastomers, researchers have created novel materials for repairing biological tissue.

The natural world is proving a useful resource for building biocompatible and environmentally friendly bio-based devices

By controlling the printing temperature of liquid crystal elastomer, researchers have induced varying levels of stiffness in a single structure.

For the first time, researchers have devised a process for the self-assembly of colloids in a diamond formation, which could be used for filtering light.

3D printing of composite parts makes counterfeiting easier

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