Puris partnered with NASA to develop an alloy used to produce bearings for the International Space Station’s wastewater.
Puris partnered with NASA to develop an alloy used to produce bearings for the International Space Station’s wastewater.

Titanium powder specialist Puris LLC has signed an agreement with NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, USA, to produce a hafnium/titanium alloy.

Marketed under the brand name SM-103, the 60NiTi(Hf) alloy reportedly demonstrates a lower residual stress than other 60NiTi alloys, resulting in improved response to heat treatment and easier processing.

The alloy is also wear-resistant and corrosion-resistant and has favorable load-bearing properties, making it suitable for industrial bearing and precision bearing applications.

‘Puris anticipates strong demand for SM-103 for industrial bearings in such applications as wind turbines, turbochargers, aircraft engines, gears and valves,’ CEO Craig Kirsch said. ‘We also expect it to find a market in precision bearings for timepieces, machine spindles and semiconductor manufacturing equipment, among others.’

Puris previously partnered with the center to develop a wear-resistant and corrosion-resistant 60NiTiNOL alloy, SM-100, that is being used to produce bearings for the International Space Station’s wastewater.

This story uses material from Puris, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier.