Figure 2. 3D topography image of a single herpes simplex virus obtained in ScanAsyst mode in buffer solution. The spatial arrangement of the individual protein molecules on the surface of the virus capsid, also known as the capsomere, is clearly visible in the AFM image (ScanAsyst Fluid+ probe, k~0.7 N/m).
Figure 2. 3D topography image of a single herpes simplex virus obtained in ScanAsyst mode in buffer solution. The spatial arrangement of the individual protein molecules on the surface of the virus capsid, also known as the capsomere, is clearly visible in the AFM image (ScanAsyst Fluid+ probe, k~0.7 N/m).

Log in to your free Materials Today account to download this application note.

DNA was one of the first biological molecules visualized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). It continues to be imaged by AFM for studies of DNA structure, topology, dynamics, and interaction with proteins. With a few exceptions, early AFM images showed DNA as a long featureless polymer
with no indication of its underlying helical structure. However, with enhanced force control and sharp AFM tips, it has been possible to resolve, in buffer solution, the two oligonucleotide strands of the Watson-Crick double helix for single DNA molecules that were physisorbed on a mica substrate.1,2 Recent advances in AFM have made such studies more achievable.3 In particular, Bruker’s exclusive PeakForce Tapping® technology has enabled routine high resolution imaging of the DNA double helix at quantifiable imaging forces, without the need for specialized probes or
restrictive AFM designs.

More content from Bruker available to download here

Already a Materials Today member?

Log in to your Materials Today account to access this feature.