Energy harvesting from moving objects and machines in our daily life, such as automobile and train, is quite important for powering portable electronics, sensor systems and high fuel efficiency. Here, we present a disc-based design that simulates the braking system in an automobile for harvesting energy when the braking pads are both in contact and in non-contact modes. The mechanisms for the design are based on a conjunction use of triboelectrification and electrostatic-induction processes. The static non-mobile charges for driving the free electrons are created by triboelectrification when the two discs of opposite tribo-polarities are in direct contact during the braking action. The process for generating electricity in non-contact mode is due to the electrostatic induction of the existing tribo-charges on the insulating pad. Our approach demonstrates an effective means for harvesting energy from a rotating disc structure during both braking and non-braking processes, with potential application in motor cycles, automobiles, and even moving trains.

(A) Schematic structure of the disc-based TENG. Inset is a photograph showing the real disc-based TENG. (B) Finite-element simulation of the potential distribution for the discs (d=5 mm) at different relative rotation angles: (a) 0°, (b) 12°, (c) 24°. (d) is the simulated maximum potential difference between PTFE and Al layer as a function of relative rotation angle.
(A) Schematic structure of the disc-based TENG. Inset is a photograph showing the real disc-based TENG. (B) Finite-element simulation of the potential distribution for the discs (d=5 mm) at different relative rotation angles: (a) 0°, (b) 12°, (c) 24°. (d) is the simulated maximum potential difference between PTFE and Al layer as a function of relative rotation angle.

This paper was originally published in Nano Energy 6 (2014) (59-65).

To read more about this article, click here.

Log in to your free Materials Today account to download the full text pdf of the article.

Already a Materials Today member?

Log in to your Materials Today account to access this feature.