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Materials Science news

By applying an intermittent electrical field, researchers have managed to get blue-phase liquid crystals to adopt novel structures with novel properties.

Researchers have found that a class of polymers known as AquaPIMs can produce an ideal membrane for use in a flow battery.

Surface-plasmon-polariton waves between a metal and a dielectric may offer a way for tiny electronic components to communicate with each other.

By studying superconductivity in molybdenum disulfide, scientists have developed a superconducting transistor and discovered new superconducting states.

By replacing some of the lead in perovskites with indium, scientists have quashed the defects in perovskite solar cells and enhanced their stability.

Using optical tweezers as a light-based ‘tractor beam’, researchers have developed a method for assembling nanomaterials into larger structures.

By analyzing the atomic structure of scandium fluoride, scientists have discovered why certain crystalline materials shrink when they're heated.

Exposing the cathode in a lithium-ion battery to a beam of concentrated light can lower the charging time by a remarkable factor of two or more.

Stable materials can be created from disordered proteins by altering the environmental triggers that cause them to undergo phase transitions.

Using computer modeling and a novel imaging technique, scientists have been able to study the self-assembly of crystalline materials at a high resolution.

Scientists have found that a broad diffraction pattern can help determine whether graphene and other 2D materials are structurally perfect.

coating silk sutures with antimicrobial spider silk proteins could alleviate the problem of post-surgical infection

By incorporating a special monomer, scientists have developed polymers that can break down more easily under certain conditions.

Applying kirigami, the Japanese art of cutting and folding, to graphene can make it more strain tolerant and adaptable to movement.

Using an electron microscope, scientists have uncovered the mechanisms that make nacre, also known as mother-of-pearl, so hard and resilient.

kirigami-inspired design allows graphene-based sensor devices to withstand large strains

By wetting porous polymer coatings with alcohol, researchers have come up with an inexpensive and scalable way to control light and heat in buildings.

New materials could arise from the unexpected discovery of unusual configurations of oxygen and nitrogen on graphene.

A new technique for probing the crystalline microstructure of battery cathodes can reveal the short-term order of the ions in these materials.

Scientists have used a novel technique called lensless microscopy to uncover previously unknown abilities in nickel and barium hexaferrite.

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