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Carbon news

For the first time, researchers have been able to grow, image with atomic resolution and investigate the properties of 2D amorphous carbon.

Researchers have developed a new version of the high-pressure carbon monoxide gas-phase process for producing single-walled carbon nanotubes.

Turning natural atomic flaws inside diamond anvils into quantum sensors offers a novel way to study the effects of pressure on materials.

Taking inspiration from drug discovery, scientists have developed metal-organic frameworks that can capture carbon dioxide from wet flue gasses.

Making a diamond-like material from bilayer graphene

A new model has revealed how tiny tweaks to the molecular shapes in non-fullerene acceptors can improve the performance of organic solar cells.

Rotating layers of boron nitride above and below a graphene layer introduces moiré superlattices that modify the graphene's electronic properties.

highly porous polymer foam that mimic bone marrow drives the differentiation of blood-forming stem cells

CNTs produced from CO2 using low-energy chemical processes drastically reduce emissions associated with construction materials

Continuing research in the field of nanomaterials for energy storage will be critical for the widespread adoption of sustainable energy sources.

Scientists have discovered two co-existing phases in a layered, copper-containing crystal that are connected through a quadruple energy well.

Scientists have found that multilayer graphene is stiff when bent a little, but becomes much softer when bent a lot, as the layers slide past each other.

Exposing the cathode in a lithium-ion battery to a beam of concentrated light can lower the charging time by a remarkable factor of two or more.

Scientists have found that a broad diffraction pattern can help determine whether graphene and other 2D materials are structurally perfect.

Applying kirigami, the Japanese art of cutting and folding, to graphene can make it more strain tolerant and adaptable to movement.

kirigami-inspired design allows graphene-based sensor devices to withstand large strains

New materials could arise from the unexpected discovery of unusual configurations of oxygen and nitrogen on graphene.

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