Carbon news, January 2016

Scientists have shown that microwave impedance microscopy can be used to determine several properties of individual nanotubes.

New carbon materials are finding a plethora of new applications in environmental and other key technology sectors.

Congratulations to our editors listed in Thomson Reuters 'World's Most Influential Scientific Minds 2015'.

Depositing organic polymers on a metal substrate offers a new way to fabricate atomically-controlled carbon nanostructures.

Monolayers of hollow carbon spheres can make a novel, low-cost, ultra-lightweight antireflective coating for microwave radiation.

Boron nitride nanotubes produce strong polymer composites than carbon nanotubes.

Simple synthesis strategy could enable carbon nanomaterials to retain their unique properties in three-dimensions.

Skin-like polymeric material uses carbon nanotubes to bring a sense of touch to robotic and prosthetic devices.

two innovations could overcome the limitations of carbon nanotube transistors

Scientists have experimentally confirmed that graphene nanoribbons with certain precise widths are metallic rather than semiconducting.

Explore the full issue on ScienceDirect.

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