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Optical materials news

A new 3D printing method, which involves lifting complex shapes from a vat of liquid, is up to 100 times faster than conventional 3D printing processes.

light-emitting diodes based on perovskites that have surpassed a milestone in efficiency

Pristine graphene formed into geometric shapes such as narrow ribbons connected to wide-open regions can efficiently convert light into electricity.

By patterning and then shrinking a polymer scaffold, researchers have come up with a way to fabricate nanoscale, 3D objects of nearly any shape.

Conventional computers could be replaced by massively parallel, low energy, more intelligent brain-like processors using artificial synaptic devices

Congratulations to Prof M Stanley Whittingham.

By adding sodium to a lead-free all-inorganic perovskite, physicists have produced a single material that can produce white light.

Scientists have used magnetic fields to create liquid crystal elastomers that can move in any direction in response to multiple types of stimuli.

Circularly polarized light delivered at a particular angle to C-shaped gold nanoparticles produced a plasmonic response unlike any discovered before.

bridging the gaps between aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes with metal atoms boosts electrical conductivity in a new direction

A silicon photonic crystal with topological geometry can transmit light round corners with virtually no loss at smaller scales than ever before.

Liquid crystals can template the formation of arrays of polymer nanofibers to produce coatings that are sticky, repellent, insulating or light emitting.

better understanding of stability of perovskites will aid application in large-area or flexible solar energy systems

Find out the recipients of the 2018 Extreme Mechanics Letters Young Investigator Award.

Researchers have used 2D materials to construct metalenses that are one-tenth to one-half the thickness of the wavelengths of light they focus.

Scientists have dramatically improved the response of graphene to light by self-assembling a mesh of polymer nanowires that conduct electricity.

By incorporating a network of elastic additives, chemical engineers have increased the flexibility of a conventional organic photovoltaic material.

Using a phase-change material, engineers have developed a novel film for the windows in buildings that can reject 70% of the sun's incoming heat.

A new electron microscopy technique can reveal how nanomaterials change in response to illumination with different wavelengths of light.

A new metal-organic framework can simultaneously produce hydrogen and clean pollutants from water when irradiated with visible light.

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