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Optical materials news, October 2018

A polymer gel that incorporates chloroplasts from plants can react with carbon dioxide in the air to grow, strengthen and even repair itself.

Semiconductor made from organic and inorganic materials can convert electricity into light efficiently.

A novel light-based atomic force microscopy technique can measure how and where a material's physical properties change during 3D printing.

Using a supercomputer, scientists have managed to predict the electrical and optical properties of hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites.

simple method produces centimeter-sized single crystals of organolead halide perovskites

Researchers have combined experiment and theory to elucidate the electronic structure and optical behavior of novel gold and silver alloys.

A bio-inspired soft material can alter its properties by self-assembling into molecular superstructures and then disassembling on demand.

A flat lens made of silicon nanopillars with various cross-sectional shapes can focus a large range of colors of any polarization to the same focal spot.

Halide perovskites can maintain their crystalline structure even while the atoms in their crystals undergo unusually large-scale vibrational motion.

A novel passive daytime radiative cooling polymer coating with nano-to-microscale air voids can act as a spontaneous air cooler on buildings.

Scientists have computed the optical properties, including transmittance, absorbance and reflectance, of 55 2D materials.

Researchers have developed a method for creating an antenna made from a two-dimensional material that can be sprayed onto almost any surface.

A nano-filter made from sheets that naturally grow on liquid metal can clean dirty water over 100 times faster than current technology.

A novel, zero-dimensional photoluminescent material is cheap to fabricate, does not use toxic starting materials and is very stable.

A unique combination of imaging tools and atomic-level simulations has revealed that a hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite film is ferroelastic.

Treating two-dimensional boron nitride with a superacid helps it to bind with other materials, including nanoparticles and graphene.

Researchers have shown that complex macroscale superstructures can be assembled from building blocks comprising pyramid-shaped quantum dots.

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