Optical materials news, September 2020

NICE coating lights up medical devices

NIR dye-polymer fluorescent coating helps surgeons visualize medical devices in the body

By combining low-energy photons to produce high-energy excited states, researchers have developed a novel polymerization process.

Researchers have found that aluminum nanoparticles with sharper corners are better able to utilize light to catalyze chemical reactions.

Researchers have discovered that an alloy of manganese, ruthenium and gallium can act as a super-fast magnetic switch.

Researchers have replicated a famous painting by shining white light on a glass slide stippled with millions of titanium dioxide nanopillars.

Atoms in 2D tantalum disulfide arrange themselves into six-pointed stars that can be manipulated by light, thus altering the material's refractive index.

A material known as organic manganese halide can make an environmentally friendly, low-cost, flexible X-ray scintillator.

Researchers have demonstrated a new approach to slowing light significantly by trapping it in a resonator made of nanoscale silicon bars.

By combing organic molecules with silver electrodes, researchers have set a new efficiency record for color-neutral, transparent solar cells.

new form of lithography can produce extremely sharp bowtie nanoantennas for improved plasmonics

By utilizing zinc oxide fins, researchers have produced LEDs that can generate about 100 to 1000 times as much power as typical tiny LEDs.

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