Mechanical CHANGE TOPIC

Mechanical properties news, January 2019

By coating cotton with a conducting polymer, researchers have developed a fabric that can harvest body heat to power wearable electronic devices.

Researchers have created 3D-printed, flexible mesh structures made of silicone that can be controlled with applied magnetic fields.

Researchers have developed methods for 3D printing piezoelectric materials that can convert stress from any direction into electrical energy.

Guided by theoretical calculations, researchers have discovered a new class of promising thermoelectric materials.

Using a new theory called stress localization, scientists have created a durable silicone polymer coating capable of repelling ice from any surface.

Structures made from stimuli-responsive materials can determine which of multiple possible actions to take in response to their environment.

A new catalog details the sizes and shapes of the holes that would most likely be observed in 2D materials when a given number of atoms is removed.

Chinese researchers develop the world’s first ‘living biofilm’ adhesive with tuneable behaviour

Research could improve layered materials and predict earthquakes

movement of tiny, simple silicon nanomotors in an electric field can be controlled remotely using light

mushroom-like gold nanowires on soft, flexible substrates could enable a new generation of wearable or implantable stretchable electronic devices

Using embedded liquid crystals, scientists have created a shape-shifting polymer material that can morph from one sophisticated form to another.

A composite made of lignin, nylon and carbon fiber possesses just the right mix of viscosity when hot and strength when cool for 3D printing.

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