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Characterization CHANGE TOPIC

Characterization news, October 2019

Scientists have discovered that chains of atoms can dash around at lightning speeds inside the cubic phase of pure titanium.

Scientists have shown that the presence of certain compounds in the liquid electrolyte of lithium batteries prompts the growth of dendrites and whiskers.

Due to a new quantum mechanism, the heat generated by friction is significantly lower in topological insulators than in conventional materials.

Electric current can simultaneously flow clockwise and counterclockwise in a ring of a polycrystalline material made from bismuth and palladium.

Researchers have gained new insights into high-entropy alloys by using X-ray spectroscopy to create atomic-resolution chemical maps of them.

The superconducting state of uranium ditelluride rises, breaks down and then re-emerges on exposure to very strong magnetic field.

Researchers have developed an artificial, layered crystal composed of the elements lanthanum, titanium, cobalt and oxygen in atom-thick sheets.

Researchers have found that submerging a polymer in liquid water can boost its ability to selectively remove carbon dioxide from gas mixtures.

Scientists have discovered that the magic angle at which two layers of graphene become superconducting is slightly wider than originally thought.

Researchers have found that graphene has many of the same mechanical properties as 3D graphite and is significantly thicker than widely believed.

Researchers have found that a crystal made of cobalt, manganese and gallium is a room-temperature topological magnet that hosts quantum loops.

Smart skin that responds to heat and sunlight

Coating chlorine-etched aluminum foil with carbon nanotubes created a material that is 10 times blacker than anything previously reported.

Crystallographic dislocations can impact the ability of halide perovskites to hold energy derived from light in the form of excited electrons.

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