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Computation CHANGE TOPIC

Computation and theory news, August 2018

Scientists take control of line defects in bilayer graphene

Using video game controllers with electron microscopy, researchers have developed a way to move line defects around in bilayer graphene.

Computer simulations show water responds to nanoscale surface patterning

Computer simulations show that nanoscale patterning on surfaces is an effective means of engineering materials for unique water dynamics.

A novel platinum-gold alloy, 100 times more durable than high-strength steel, is believed to be the most wear-resistant metal in the world.

Two types of nanoribbons produce material that traps single electrons at the junctions of ribbon segments.

Researchers have discovered that mixing granular materials creates both mixed and non-mixed regions.

New polymeric material with applications in tissue engineering and cellular transplantation.

Scientists have discovered that negatively curved carbon sheets known as schwarzites can be synthesized inside the pores of zeolites.

The puzzle-like wavy structure of the seed coat found in some grasses could hold the secret to creating smart materials that are both flexible and strong.

Scientists have discovered that tiny distortions in the crystal lattice of iron pnictide help it to enter a superconducting state as it's cooled.

Quantum computing could benefit from the finding that electrons can be trapped between graphene nanoribbons with different topologies,

Researchers have found that ‘rebar graphene’, in which graphene is reinforced with carbon nanotubes, is more than twice as tough as pristine graphene.

A new artificial intelligence model can accurately detect different atomic structures in metallic materials with defects.

Using a form of Raman microscopy developed for biomedical studies, scientists have explored the mechanism behind dendrite growth in lithium batteries.

A cobalt-tungsten catalyst starts growing carbon nanotubes with various chiral angles but redirects almost all of them toward one fast-growing variant.

Researchers have developed a new way for modeling to the atomic level how metallic glasses behave as they fracture.

Publishing the proceedings from leading conference series.

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