Computation CHANGE TOPIC

Computation and theory news, September 2018

Researchers have trained an artificial neural network to predict stable materials in two classes of crystals known as garnets and perovskites.

Replacing metallic nanoantennas with silicon ones for perovskites in solar cells.

X-ray studies have revealed that the pathways lithium ions take through a common battery material are more complex than previously thought.

Tetrahedron nanostructures composed of certain metals can have a higher degree of symmetry than the geometrical symmetry of spherical atoms.

Scientists have developed a novel 3D printing process for creating hydrogels with complex 3D shapes and motions.

A new technique can create an individual fingerprint of the current-carrying edge states occurring in topological insulators or 2D materials.

Stress-corrosion cracking can occur when a metal is exposed to tensile stress and corrosion separately, as well as simultaneously.

As much as 100 times more heat than predicted by standard radiation theory can flow between the edges of two very thin semiconductor plates.

High-entropy alloys made from metals known to form shape-memory alloys can produce shape-memory alloys that work at high temperatures.

Scientists have verified a key prediction from a 55-year-old theory about how electrons move through one-dimensional nanotubes and nanowires.

Nanoscale diamond needles can bend and deform reversibly, like bristles on a brush, before breaking.

Scientists have induced a two-dimensional material to cannibalize itself for atomic ‘building blocks’ that go on to form stable structures.

Using computational simulations, scientists have discovered the process by which an iron-based superconductor collapses under pressure.

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