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Computation CHANGE TOPIC

Computation and theory news, November 2019

Researchers have formulated design rules that guide how ribosomes can incorporate new kinds of monomers to produce synthetic polymers.

Scientists have discovered two co-existing phases in a layered, copper-containing crystal that are connected through a quadruple energy well.

New class of polymers brings cheaper grid batteries

The electron pairs responsible for the abilities of superconductors can also conduct electricity with some amount of resistance, like metals do.

Scientists have found that multilayer graphene is stiff when bent a little, but becomes much softer when bent a lot, as the layers slide past each other.

A lightweight polymer material full of holes, inspired by theoretical nanotube structures called tubulanes, is nearly as hard as diamond.

Using computer-based simulations of atoms and molecules in solution, scientists have identified a general mechanism governing crystal growth.

By analyzing the atomic structure of scandium fluoride, scientists have discovered why certain crystalline materials shrink when they're heated.

Using computer modeling and a novel imaging technique, scientists have been able to study the self-assembly of crystalline materials at a high resolution.

Applying kirigami, the Japanese art of cutting and folding, to graphene can make it more strain tolerant and adaptable to movement.

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