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Computation CHANGE TOPIC

Computation and theory news, March 2018

Using an array of circuit boards, scientists have produced a ‘human scale’ analogue of a new phase of matter known as quadrupole topological insulators.

Computer models suggest that a material comprising floors of boron nitride separated by boron nitride pillars could store a large amount of hydrogen.

Theory has guided the development of a new piezeoelectric material with twice the piezo response of any existing commercial ferroelectric ceramics.

Scientists have shown that both the proportion and distribution of chemical groups at the surface of silica dictates how it interacts with water.

A new chemical vapor deposition method can produce single-crystal-like graphene films by supplying hydrocarbon molecules to the edge of the growing film.

Researchers have discovered more details about the way certain materials hold a static electric charge even after two surfaces separate.

Wearable non-invasive sensors could allow continuous and convenient glucose-monitoring in diabetes.

Lab experiments retracing the chemical steps leading to the creation of complex hydrocarbons in space could offer new ways to produce graphene.

Using advanced computational methods, scientists have discovered new materials that could enhance the efficiency and lifetime of solid oxide fuel cells.

A novel machine learning-based method for classifying steel is much more accurate and objective than conventional quality control procedures.

Using state-of-the-art microscopy techniques, scientists have discovered that a prototypical ‘relaxor’ material has an unexpected atomic structure.

Using 'molecular anvils' made from tiny diamond particles, scientists have conducted the first chemical reactions triggered by mechanical pressure alone.

Researchers used data mining and computational tools to discover a new phosphor material for white LEDs that is inexpensive and easy to make.

Using experiments and modeling, scientists have found that interactions between layers of 2D titanium disulfide are stronger than theory suggests.

High-intensity infrared laser pulses have revealed a hidden state of electronic order in a cuprate comprising lanthanum, barium, copper and oxygen.

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