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Electronic CHANGE TOPIC

Electronic properties news, April 2014

Graphene and carbon nanotubes combine to make spaser for future flexible electronics.

Superconducting nano-mechanical resonators made from boron-doped diamond could find application in quantum opto-mechanics.

Scientists found that the size of the impurities determines whether the wire’s superconducting properties are either hindered or improved.

Researchers observed experiments for the first time in highly charged ions.

A team of nanotechnology researchers have discovered new methods to build heat resistant nanostructures and arrays using RNA.

Plastic-magnetic sandwich bridges gap between data storage and transmission.

Scientists may be able to develop new techniques to eliminate charge stripes and help pave the way for room-temperature superconductivity.

Scientists at MIT and the City College of New York have achieved imaging excitons’ motions directly.

Miniaturized optical frequency comb sources allow for transmission of data streams of several terabits per second over hundreds of kilometers.

Researchers have discovered a way to use existing semiconductors to detect a far wider range of light than is now possible, well into the infrared range.

Researchers have created a compound semiconductor of nearly perfect quality that can manipulate light energy in the mid-infrared range.

An international team of scientists has reported the first experimental observation of the quantum critical point (QCP).

An associate professor and her collaborators have developed an essential component of these new computers that would run on light.

Researchers found that the semiconductor indium nitride (InN)will emit green light if reduced to 1 nanometer-wide wires.

Take a look at the most popular news stories in materials science during March 2014.

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